Messiah complex

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Heart100.jpg Health disclosure: This article contains in-depth discussion of Chris's physical and/or mental health. This page is not to be construed as a substitute for medical advice or a professional diagnosis. All diagnoses are either taken from outside sources or based on amateur analysis.

A messiah complex is the mental state of those who believe they are, or will become, saviors. Chris started demonstrating symptoms of this type of psychosis alongside his worsening narcissism and increase in maladapative coping mechanisms.

In the latter half of the 2010s Chris increasingly started resorting to his fantasy world as a way of coping with the pressures of reality and, after being influenced by the Idea Guys' cult-like grip, (who utilized a parody series about video game deities to manipulate Chris), he gradually built up a belief that these deities really existed in another dimension, and copied the lore about them to make up an imaginary counterpart of himself with their powers, CPU Blue Heart. Chris also attempted without success to orchestrate a Dimensional Merge to unite himself with said counterpart to gain an array of godlike powers, all as a maladaptive coping mechanism against his bleak life.

Origin of the Messiah complex

Main articles: Chris and his ego#Narcissistic personality disorder and Chris and coping

Chris's messiah complex grew out of two already existing problems he had, namely his narcissism and his maladaptive coping mechanisms.

Since before his discovery, Chris believed he had magic powers; he used to curse people he didn't like (men) and bless people he liked (women). Due to trolls acting like these curses actually worked, Chris got the confirmation that some of his powers were real. He also thought God and Jesus had a special interest in his life and were appearing in his dreams to help him.

In his comics Chris gave himself god like powers to beat up the people he didn't like and change IRL situations where he was punished by authorities to a situation where he won against the authorities i.e, a Mary Sue. For a long time comic Chris and real Chris were separate individuals in Chris's mind, but with the coming of the Idea Guys and Teen Troon Squad the line between reality and fiction got blurred and he mixed himself and his self insert up.

As he had to prove to the fans that his newfound magic powers were real, he came up with the most rational solution he could think of; the dimensional merge. This helped blow his messiah complex out of proportion.

Dimensional Merge

Main article: Dimensional Merge

The Merge is a concept where two dimensions, one where Chris is a loser and another where he is a god are merging where the end result is a single Chris with godlike powers. He created the concept of the merge to answer why his powers are being activated after 36 years of his miserable existence.

This was most likely created as a means of coping from his life where he was the man of the house and had to take care of his mother, pay bills and do tasks he considers to be stressful. He also uses the merge to justify why he does nothing daily and to give himself hope that things might get better in the future.

To stroke his ego and get confirmation that his godlike powers are being activated, he made his fictional characters worship him, for him these characters are living and their worship is equivalent to worship by actual people. Seeing this, many enablers also started worshipping him and created a relegion based on him to get on his good side. Due to all this reaffirmation in his believes he started thinking he is a god.

Examples of the Messiah complex

  • Phrases such as "Oh, My Chris Chan!"[1][2] and "Chris Chan Sonichu is watching over you"[3] - replacing the word "God" with his nickname.
  • Asked people to pray to him multiple times.
  • Has said he is looks over others lives to make sure no bad happens to them (though one person he was looking over did get divorced)
  • Claims to make sure (many) people don't die of diseases.

See also

References